Campaigning for a better NZ - Mark Byford


I'm eighteen and live in Palmerston North. I've been involved in the Labour Party since I was 14 when Sue Moroney took me along to my first Labour meeting the Tory heartland town of Cambridge.

I didn't know what to expect from the Labour Party and the people who make up it but I was amazed at the close bond activists and members share with one another. The warm and friendly environment at my very first meeting has kept me in the Labour Party ever since.

I feel like the people I've met in the Labour Party are people I will never forget, they are people who don't judge you on your religion, sexual orientation, gender, nationality, ethnicity or age. The people that make up the Labour Party from the elderly women delivering leaflets in Helensville to David Cunliffe, are some of the most intelligent, compassionate and dedicated people you will ever meet. Not only dedicated to seeing Labour win in September but dedicated to giving people a fighting chance to get ahead, get a good paying job, own their own home and not have to worry about the power bill every month.

Now, four years on, the Labour Party has taken over my life! Working on Iain Lees-Galloway's campaign, I feel like I'm playing my part to change the direction of this country for the better and restore the Kiwi dream for the millions who's only hope rests with a Labour Government being elected in September. From waving the Labour flag at street corner meetings to phone canvassing voters, campaigns are never short of work to be done. There are many life lessons you can learn in politics, but the most important is the strength of the individual in promoting positive change, especially in the Labour Party.

Money is no barrier to moving up in the Labour Party, it's not hard to realise from the beginning, that Labour is a party that puts people first.

Politics is no day job. It's a lifelong commitment.

We need people who are keen to make a difference this election. Will you join me?


Campaigning in Papatoetoe North

Andrew Kirton on August 15, 2014

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