Survey shows parents want smaller class sizes

A new survey finding most parents believe class sizes are too big shows Labour is right to reduce them, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.

“The Post-Primary Teachers' Association survey of 750 people conducted by UMR Research found 54 per cent of people with dependent children believed class sizes were too big.

“It also found 83 percent of all Kiwis believed there should be a maximum of 25 students or less in secondary school classes and 45 per cent thought there should be 20 students or fewer.

Minister fails to learn from class size debacle

Hekia Parata has learnt nothing from two years of public outcry and still believes class sizes don’t matter, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.

“Class sizes do matter. Ask any parent and they will tell you they want their kids in smaller classes. Labour has listened.

“Increasing teacher quality and smaller class sizes are not mutually exclusive. Having more time to spend with their pupils means teachers have more time to reflect on their practise, undertake professional development and spend on kids who are falling behind.

Labour to revolutionise schools and learning

A Labour Government will modernise New Zealand’s schools and close the digital divide by ensuring all students in Years 5-13 have access to a portable computer in the classroom and their home, Labour Leader David Cunliffe says.

“The world has changed but our schools haven’t.

“The average age of our schools is 42 years old and fewer than half meet Education Ministry standards for modern learning. Labour will rebuild out-dated and worn-out buildings so every school is fit for the 21st Century by 2030.

Education for the 21st Century

Education for the 21st Century


Labour's plan - we'll put people first

Labour will ensure that schools are able to equip our kids for the future and that every child, no matter what their background, can benefit from a 21st century education.

Labour will end ‘voluntary’ school donations

Labour will provide an annual grant of $100 per student to schools that stop asking parents for “voluntary” donations to help fund their day-to-day spending, Labour Leader David Cunliffe says.

“New Zealand has long prided itself on our public school system under which core spending is government funded. It’s unfair to teachers, boards of trustees, parents and kids to expect donations to subsidise running their schools.

School Donations

<< Education

Labour will:

  • guarantee that the education sector gets enough funding to maintain real spending in the face of inflation and population growth
  • provide extra funding to schools that agree not to ask parents for ‘voluntary’ donations


Do not gamble with state education, Mr Key

National must rule out gambling with New Zealand’s State education system and categorically dismiss ACT’s dangerous charter schools plan, Labour Leader David Cunliffe said.

“In media this morning John Key appeared to put a dollar each way on ACT’s proposal to issue vouchers for state schools, saying ‘I think they’d work really effectively … but I wouldn’t want to mix the two too much.’

“Voters need to know exactly where National stands on this critical issue.

Call for calm after school incident

Mangere MP Su’a William Sio is calling for calm and patience following this morning’s alleged stabbing at Pacific Christian School.

“Our first thoughts are with the victim and with the children and their parents.

“The school will need support and it is hoped that the Ministry of Education’s traumatic incident team is providing help for the students, their families and the teachers.

“It is unfortunate that teachers have to deal with these sorts of incidents. It is of even more concern that the children involved in this instance are primary school pupils.

Replacing National Standards

<< Education

National Standards results are no measure of effective teaching. National Standards narrow the focus of teaching, encouraging teachers and students to focus time and attention on getting students over an arbitrary hurdle, rather than supporting that child to achieve their full potential.

National Standards are being used to stereo-type schools through league tables that don’t measure student progress, only the number of students jumping the hurdle at a particular time.


Subscribe to Education