What do WOF plans mean for already stretched police?

Kiwis deserve an explanation as to what exactly the Government expects our front-line police to be checking on the roadside as a result of National’s changes to the WOF regime, Labour’s Police spokesman Kris Faafoi said today.

“In a rare move the Government has loosened the purse strings to allow between $2.5 and $5 million in additional funding for police to implement the new regime. But without details of the frequency and extent of checks police will have to perform it is hard to measure the true impact this will have on the front-line.

“It also raises questions about Police Minister Anne Tolley’s priorities. Is implementing a new WOF system really the best use of police time and resources?

“I think Kiwis want to see police spending most of their time preventing and fighting crime, not checking indicator lights, wiper blades and tyre treads,” Kris Faafoi said.

“Safety is paramount on our roads, but police have enough on their hands as it is.

“The Minister needs to give details about what our police officers will be required to do. Will they be expected to have a standard check of all vehicles they pull over to ensure they’re safe? If so, that’s time, training and money – and a few million won’t go far,” Kris Faafoi said.