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Hon Stuart Nash

MP for Napier

Minister of Police, Fisheries, Revenue, and Small Business

Contact Hon Stuart Nash

Hon. Stuart Nash was elected Labour MP for Napier in 2014. He was sworn in as Minister of Police, Revenue, Fisheries and for Small Business in October 2017 following the general election.

Mr. Nash first entered politics in 2008 as a list MP and has been the Labour spokesperson for Police, Energy, Revenue, Forestry, Economic Development and Land Information.

In his maiden speech Mr Nash described himself as first and foremost a public servant, employed by the people of New Zealand; and as a social democrat committed to sustainable economic development and growth.

Prior to entering politics Minister Nash worked in senior management in small and large organisations in both the private and public sectors. His wide-ranging career has included roles in IT, sales and marketing, business strategy, resource planning, strategic planning and general management. 

Mr. Nash completed a Bachelor of Arts (History) at Victoria University before moving to Canterbury University where he gained a Post Graduate Diploma in Forestry and a Masters in Forestry Science. He also holds a Post Graduate Diploma and Master’s Degree in Business Management and a Master of Law.

He is the great grandson of the third Labour Prime Minister Sir Walter Nash, and grew up in Napier where his father was a local lawyer and his mother was a school dental nurse.

He attended Napier Boys High School where he was a prefect and captain of the debating team and where his sporting interests included rugby, cricket and representative tennis. He is married to Sarah and has four children. He is currently a member of the Parliamentary cross-party rugby team, and enjoys all sports but these days more from an armchair than a court, pitch or field.

Contact Hon Stuart Nash

Napier electorate office

Phone: 06 835 6093
Email: stuart.nashmp@parliament.govt.nz

155A Tennyson Street, Napier South, Napier
PO Box 827, Napier 4140

Parliamentary office

Phone: 04 817 8712
Email: stuart.nash@parliament.govt.nz

Freepost PO Box 18 888
Parliament Buildings, Wellington 6160


Latest from Hon Stuart Nash

Small business the focus of Australian talks

December 11, 2018

Efforts to progress a seamless trans-Tasman business environment will take another step at a ministerial roundtable meeting in Sydney tomorrow.

Small Business Minister Stuart Nash and Australian Assistant Treasurer Stuart Robert will co-host a roundtable meeting of senior government and business leaders. The discussion will focus on ways to advance e-Invoicing and support faster payment times for small business.

“There is a clear opportunity to streamline business-to-business transactions both within New Zealand and in trans-Tasman commerce,” Mr Nash says.

“Every year Australian and New Zealand businesses process about 1.6 billion invoices, but those still using paper and email-based invoices are using labour-intensive systems that are prone to error and delay. Research indicates that the economic savings of e-Invoicing could exceed $30 billion across both countries over 10 years.

“We recognise the benefits of developing a trans-Tasman approach to enhance the direct electronic exchange of invoices between the accounting systems used by suppliers and buyers.

“The round table discussions will give both governments the opportunity to engage with business CEOs and industry and sector leaders on the progress being made. Regular engagements with our Australian partners are crucial to ensure that this joint initiative continues to progress.

“We will discuss achievements to date, the benefits of e-Invoicing for both economies and the role Government can play. We will also set out milestones and timeframes for further work and seek input and ideas from industry leaders about questions such as infrastructure, business readiness, international alignments, and any regulatory issues.

“Both Governments are committed to e-Invoicing. We’ll also highlight our intention to drive action that will ensure faster payment times for small businesses and the importance of establishing the right technological infrastructure.

“The New Zealand Government is committed to growing our economy and working with businesses to encourage productivity. The roundtable meeting on e-Invoicing is another step toward this. It continues the commitments made by both Prime Ministers at the trans-Tasman leaders’ meeting in March. The Single Economic Market agenda is about a seamless business environment through collaboration on key economic initiatives and co-ordination of regulatory measures,” says Mr Nash. 

Mr Nash and Mr Robert will be joined by Australian and New Zealand CEOs from industry bodies and software providers, and senior leaders from the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, Inland Revenue, the Australian Treasury and the Australian Taxation Office.

The e-Invoicing initiative was announced as part of Budget 2018 and the formal trans-Tasman e-Invoicing Arrangement was signed in October 2018. It formalises the commitment of both countries to work together on a framework to ensure inter-operability for e-Invoicing frameworks.

The round table discussion at Sydney’s Sofitel Hotel will involve about 30 participants including some who will take part via video link from Wellington. 

While in Sydney Mr Nash will also meet the New South Wales Commissioner of Police Mick Fuller for discussions around mutual cooperation on organised crime.


Tax reforms focus on fairness

December 05, 2018

New tax legislation has been introduced to Parliament to ensure greater fairness in the way the tax system shapes commerce, investment decisions and social policies.

Revenue Minister Stuart Nash has introduced the Taxation (Annual Rates for 2019-20, GST Offshore Supplier Registration, and Remedial Matters) Bill.

“The bill implements two major policies which went through public consultation earlier this year, as well as picking up on smaller issues which have been the source of some frustration and complaint for those who deal with the revenue system,” says Mr Nash.

“The legislation establishes a framework to collect GST on low-value imported goods. The changes put local retailers on a level playing field with foreign firms who have taken advantage of the tax break. There are 26,000 small businesses in the retail sector employing more than 62,000 people. They are required to collect GST on all sales, and now the same requirement will apply to offshore retail giants.

“The new GST collection system applies to imported goods valued under $1000 and will come into effect on 1 October 2019. GST on goods valued above $1000 will continue to be collected by Customs when the goods enter New Zealand. 

“The internet has opened up more markets for global companies but if they want to do business here they must follow the rules like everyone else. We’re not the first to introduce such a rule and eventually this will be the new reality of doing business. 

“The second major change will mean residential property investors no longer get a tax break by using losses on rental properties to offset the tax payable on other sources of income such as salary and wages.

“Currently investors with loss-making rental properties can subsidise part of the cost of their mortgages through reduced tax on other income, helping them to outbid owner-occupiers for properties.  Yet these investors often make tax-free capital gains when these properties are sold. 

  “In conjunction with the extension to the bright-line test, ring-fencing losses from rental properties would make property speculation less attractive and level the playing field between property investors and home buyers. The new rules will not apply to a person’s main home or a property that is rented out and used privately such as a bach.

“The legislation also recognises the growing use of te reo Māori as an everyday language, including by many businesses. Inland Revenue has allowed taxpayers to keep records in te reo Māori for more than 20 years but this has never been enshrined as standard practice through legislation.  The right to use te reo Māori should be officially recognised in the law, rather than at the discretion of a Government department. 

 “Another wrong that is righted by this bill is the situation where a person who is the victim of a sex offence becomes liable for child support payments for a baby born as a consequence of that offence.  

“Although an exemption is available to prevent this liability, it has only been granted twice in twelve years. In order for a victim to qualify for the exemption, the offender must have been prosecuted. Sadly, all too often sex offences are not reported and even once reported, few result in a conviction. The law change will mean the Commissioner of Inland Revenue can use her discretion in such cases when deciding whether an exemption should be granted. Not only do we want a fairer tax system, we also want a humane and effective justice system, and this change will help to achieve that. 

“The bill also tidies up a somewhat confusing situation where domestic student loan borrowers are eligible for interest-free loans, but find they are charged interest which is then written off at the end of each year. This has been required as a technical workaround because of the IRD’s aged technology platform. Now with the transition to a new platform, we can finally clear up that confusion and not charge interest for these borrowers in the first place.” 

“Our revenue system enables the funding of our vital public services but it also needs to operate fairly in the way tax is administered and collected. These changes achieve those objectives and create a fairer system,” Mr Nash says.

The bill is expected to have its first reading on 12 December 2018.

For more information see taxpolicy.ird.govt.nz.


Preventing death and injury on our roads

November 30, 2018

Police Minister Stuart Nash and Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter are encouraging road users to be alert to a new safety campaign launched today by Police and the NZ Transport Agency in the lead up to the Christmas.

“Too many people are dying on our roads and we want to support our agencies in getting the message out to drivers and riders to be safe,” says Mr Nash.

“However, everyone using the road needs to take responsibility. It’s up to all of us drive to the conditions and to not treat the speed limit as a suggestion.

Everybody needs to pay attention to what they’re doing and when you’re socialising over summer, don’t drink and drive.”

Today Police and the NZTA kicked off the summer season with their annual impairment prevention operation, which will be followed by a Police social media campaign focusing on the four main contributors of trauma on our roads.

These are people not wearing seatbelts, driving too fast for the conditions, driving drunk, drugged, or tired, and being distracted by things like cell phones.

Ms Genter says reducing the number of deaths and serious accidents on our roads is her top priority as the Associate Minister of Transport.

“These crashes impact families and communities across New Zealand,’’ she says. “I don’t want to see more people facing the festive season without their loved ones.’’

“Police will be out on the roads working hard to keep everyone safe. But they can’t do it alone. We all need to be responsible every time we get behind the wheel.”

Mr Nash and Ms Genter say the summer campaign by Police and NZTA has a simple and clear message: drive safely.

 


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