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Hon Stuart Nash

MP for Napier

Minister of Police, Fisheries, Revenue, and Small Business

Contact Hon Stuart Nash

Stuart Nash was elected Labour MP for Napier in 2014. He was sworn in as Minister of Police, Revenue, Fisheries and for Small Business in October 2017 following the general election.

Stuart first entered politics in 2008 as a list MP and has been the Labour spokesperson for Police, Energy, Revenue, Forestry, Economic Development and Land Information.

In his maiden speech Stuart described himself as first and foremost a public servant, employed by the people of New Zealand; and as a social democrat committed to sustainable economic development and growth.

Prior to entering politics, Stuart worked in senior management in small and large organisations in both the private and public sectors. His wide-ranging career has included roles in IT, sales and marketing, business strategy, resource planning, strategic planning and general management. 

Stuart completed a Bachelor of Arts (History) at Victoria University before moving to Canterbury University where he gained a Post Graduate Diploma in Forestry and a Masters in Forestry Science. He also holds a Post Graduate Diploma and Master’s Degree in Business Management and a Master of Law.

He is the great grandson of the third Labour Prime Minister Sir Walter Nash, and grew up in Napier where his father was a local lawyer and his mother was a school dental nurse.

He attended Napier Boys High School where he was a prefect and captain of the debating team and where his sporting interests included rugby, cricket and representative tennis. He is married to Sarah and has four children. He is currently a member of the Parliamentary cross-party rugby team, and enjoys all sports - but these days more from an armchair than a court, pitch or field.

Contact Hon Stuart Nash

Napier electorate office

Phone: 06 835 6093
Email: stuart.nashmp@parliament.govt.nz

155A Tennyson Street, Napier South, Napier
PO Box 827, Napier 4140

Parliamentary office

Phone: 04 817 8712
Email: stuart.nash@parliament.govt.nz

Freepost PO Box 18 888
Parliament Buildings, Wellington 6160


Napier electorate enquiries

Latest from Hon Stuart Nash

Compliance strengthened for property speculation

June 18, 2019

Inland Revenue is to gain greater oversight of land transfer information to ensure those buying and selling properties are complying with tax rules on property speculation.

Cabinet has agreed to implement recommendation 99 of the Tax Working Group’s (TWG) final report. It will require most people who buy and sell properties to supply their IRD number on land transfer documentation.

Revenue Minister Stuart Nash says the TWG made the recommendation after hearing submissions on ways to improve the fairness, balance and structure of the tax system.

“Most people already provide their IRD number to Land Information NZ (LINZ) when buying and selling property, but there are some exemptions which are open to manipulation,” says Mr Nash.

“Up to one-third of land transfers are made without a record of the IRD number of the buyer or seller.

“Inland Revenue needs a complete picture of property transactions to determine if tax rules are being manipulated. The requirement for nearly all land transfers to include an IRD number is a small change but improves the overall integrity of the system.

“If a home owner regularly buys and sells their properties in a short time frame it suggests they are engaged in property speculation and are flipping properties with the intention of creating income.

“When the previous government introduced the bright line test in 2015, it made it clear that owner-occupiers with a regular pattern of buying and selling residential properties had to comply with the bright line rule in certain circumstances.

“If an owner-occupier buys and sells properties twice or more in two years, under existing law they are generally considered to be trying to manipulate the bright line test.

“The requirement to provide an IRD number on nearly all land transfers makes the rules easier to understand for everyone. It removes uncertainty around what information people need to provide when buying or selling a property. 

“Capturing the relevant tax information for property sales will also help us work with jurisdictions in other countries to combat global tax evasion,” says Mr Nash.

A Supplementary Order Paper has been tabled today to make the change to the Taxation (Annual Rates for 2019–20, GST Offshore Supplier Registration, and Remedial Matters) Bill currently before Parliament. It will apply from 1 January 2020.

A small number of land transfers do not require the provision of an IRD number. Examples include land transfers under a Treaty settlement or by a local authority.


Plan to expand protection for Maui and Hector’s dolphins

June 18, 2019

The Government is taking action to expand and strengthen the protection for Māui and Hector’s dolphins with an updated plan to deal with threats to these native marine mammals.

Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage and Minister of Fisheries Stuart Nash today released proposals for consultation for a revised Threat Management Plan to protect the Hector’s and Māui dolphins. 

“These precious dolphins are New Zealand taonga. We need to act now to ensure their populations increase and both species thrive,” says Eugenie Sage.

“Māui dolphins are nationally critical, with only an estimated 63 dolphins remaining.  Hector’s dolphins are nationally vulnerable with about 15,000 in New Zealand waters.

“The proposals include options for a significant expansion of the areas of ocean free of set nets and trawl nets to protect dolphins from the risk of bycatch in fishing nets. They are based on best available science, New Zealand and international expertise.”

“This information make it clear that the risks of bycatch to dolphins have reduced in areas where there are restrictions on set netting and trawling,” says Eugenie Sage.

“The Government recently announced that cameras were being placed on commercial fishing vessels operating in the areas of highest risk to Māui dolphins. The proposals in the new Threat Management Plan are part of a wider and ambitious programme of change in fisheries management this year,” says Stuart Nash.

“Together, they provide for the long-term protection of Hector’s and Māui dolphins and address a wide range of threats. The document recognises the need to carefully balance the proposals to protect dolphins, against the impact the changes could have on people and their livelihoods,” he says.

“The scientific risk assessment has been through multiple rounds of peer review, including by an international panel of experts, and it draws on a range of new information. Combining the latest data and expertise means this is the most comprehensive and robust assessment to date of the risks to the dolphins,” says Mr Nash.

The discussion document includes proposals to extend the boundaries of the West Coast North Island Marine Mammal Sanctuary south to Wellington and for the Banks Peninsula Marine Mammal Sanctuary to extend north to Kaikōura, south to Timaru, and offshore to 20 nautical miles.

The discussion document identifies other threats that need to be dealt with to protect the dolphins; including toxoplasmosis and sub-lethal threats such as seismic surveys and seabed mining. It includes options ranging from requiring compliance with the Department of Conservation code of conduct for seismic surveying in New Zealand’s five marine mammal sanctuaries set up to protect Hector’s and Māui dolphins to prohibiting seismic surveys and seabed mining within the sanctuaries.

The proposals also include the Department of Conservation developing an action plan to deal with toxoplasmosis, a disease that can affect dolphins and other marine mammals, by targeting research to answer knowledge gaps, enhancing education for cat owners and advocating for riparian and wetland restoration.

 A moratorium on commercial tourism permits targeting Māui dolphins is also proposed to minimise the disturbance to the dolphins from boats.

“There’s keen public interest in protecting the dolphins, with many articulate letters from young people coming into our offices. Now there’s a chance for public feedback to help us improve these proposals,” Stuart Nash says.

“We know people are passionate about marine mammals and there are a wide range of views out there about the best way to protect them. I encourage everyone to share their thoughts and make a difference,” Eugenie Sage says.

To find out more about the options, and how to have your say, go here.


Cameras on vessels to ensure sustainable fisheries

June 07, 2019

Commercial fishing vessels at greatest risk of encountering the rare Māui dolphin will be required to operate with on-board cameras from 1 November, as the next step to strengthen our fisheries management system.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash have announced new funding in Budget 2019 will ensure our fisheries are managed sustainably, compliance is encouraged, and monitoring and verification are increased.

Jacinda Ardern says one of the priorities of the Wellbeing Budget is to support regions and businesses adjust to long-term environmental challenges facing our economy. “Enhanced fisheries management helps secure a sustainable future for our marine species.”

“Māui dolphins are critically endangered. It is estimated just 63 adults remain in our waters. Their habitat stretches from Northland to Taranaki and overlaps the inshore fishery where commercial vessels catch species like snapper, tarakihi, gurnard and john dory.

“It is crucial we act to protect this fragile population of marine mammals. On-board cameras will give us independent, accurate information about the impacts of commercial fishing in this area. It will encourage compliance and ensure fishing practices are sustainable and verified.

“Enhanced fisheries management sits alongside other efforts to deal with long term environmental challenges. This includes a proposed network of marine protected areas off the Canterbury and Otago coast, legislation to tackle greenhouse gases, phasing out single-use plastics, greater funding for predator and pest control, and support for sustainable tourism growth.

“The on-board camera programme encourages our fishing industry to meet expectations from consumers and overseas regulators about how seafood is caught and how we protect species such as Māui dolphins.” says Jacinda Ardern.

Stuart Nash says the Budget sets aside $17.1 million over four years for purchase, installation and maintenance of the cameras, as well as the costs of storage, review and analysis of the footage.

“It is a significant investment and allows us to move quickly alongside industry to implement change,” says Mr Nash.

“Commercial trawlers and set netters working in Māui dolphin habitat will be required to carry cameras because their fishing methods pose most risk to dolphins.

“It will affect up to 28 vessels although the final number requiring cameras will depend on whether they continue to fish in the area using trawl or set nets. The final number may be fewer as some of these vessels may choose to fish elsewhere. 

“Other vessels that work the area use methods like long-lines, purse seine nets and potting that pose a lower risk and they will not be required to carry cameras at this stage.

“The roll-out of cameras in the Māui dolphin habitat allows time to refine systems and processes before a wider camera programme is considered across more of the commercial fleet.

“Currently many vessels in the affected area carry an independent Fisheries NZ observer on board to monitor activities. This monitoring will continue after cameras are installed while we test and refine the system.

“It is important to emphasise that cameras by themselves will not stop a dolphin being caught in a net. But international evidence from Australia, the U.S., Denmark and the U.K. shows cameras drive positive change and greatly improve the quality of fishing data.

“In Australia 75 vessels have operated with government-funded cameras since 2015. Other jurisdictions, such as British Columbia, ran four-year camera trials with the government working alongside the commercial fleet to take the time and effort to get it right.  

“Overseas experience has demonstrated the value of on-board cameras, but also made it clear we need to invest time, effort and resources for the greater public good.

“On-board cameras are the latest step in an ambitious programme to protect the marine environment and support sustainable fisheries. By December 2019 all commercial fishing vessels will be reporting their catches and positions electronically and in close to real time. This will give us better data about what they catch and where.

“Legislation is also likely to be introduced later this year after public consultation on the rules that govern commercial fishing. We sought feedback on practices around what fish can be brought back to port and what fish can be returned to sea, as well as penalties and offences.

“Greater protection for Hector’s and Māui dolphins will be achieved through a review of the Threat Management Plan (TMP) to be released for public consultation shortly.

“A renewed TMP will give us better information for fisheries management. It will drive cultural and behavioural change to ensure our marine environment is managed effectively, now and in the future,” Mr Nash says.


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