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Māori Party’s waka up river without paddle

The Māori Party’s waka is up the river without a paddle over its Waka Oranga mobile health unit pilot programme, says Labour’s Māori Development spokesperson Kelvin Davis.

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English covering for Barclay to pass legislation

The Prime Minister has been relying on Todd Barclay’s vote to pass key legislation, explaining why English has covered up the Barclay scandal for so long and why he continues to refuse to answer questions, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little.

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Typhoid report shows health officials under the hammer

A chaotic picture has emerged around the response of Auckland public health officials to this year’s typhoid outbreak, says Aupito William Sio Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesman. 

“Our Pacific community was left exposed by the Auckland Regional Public Health Services’ lack of resources. Their staff numbers were down and although two medical officers were drafted in, other public health units couldn’t help because they themselves were under pressure. This paints a dire picture of the state of public health services around the country.

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Bill English must be upfront about his involvement in Barclay scandal

Bill English’s explanations that he was on the periphery of the long running employment dispute involving Todd Barclay don’t stack up, says Labour Leader Andrew Little.

“The Prime Minister claims to have been a bystander, but we know he was donkey deep in the dispute.

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Labour will not resile from royalties

Labour believes cleaning up our rivers so that they are clean enough to swim in is the most important freshwater issue for this election, but that it is also fair that a royalty should be charged where public water is used in large quantities for private gain, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little.

“It was reported following my speech to Federated Farmers last week that Labour has abandoned its policy of charging a royalty on farming uses of water. We haven’t.

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With friends like Hone, who needs enemies?

With less than three months until the election, Hone Harawira has delivered another blow to the Māori Party’s flagship policy of Te Ture Whenua Māori reform and the already unstable MANA-Maori Party alliance, says Ikaroa-Rāwhiti MP Meka Whaitiri.

“On The Nation this weekend Hone Harawira once again slammed Te Ururoa Flavell’s Ture Whenua Māori reforms, saying he still doesn't support the bill, and neither do his party’s members.

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Shifty Bill jumps the shark

Bill English's claim today that it has never been established that Todd Barclay's recordings of his staff took place is bizarre and shows a complete lack of honesty and leadership, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. 

"Todd Barclay told Bill English that he had recorded his staff member. There was a massive pay out made to the staff member because of that and Todd Barclay has resigned because of the recordings.

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Te Ture Whenua – gone by lunchtime?

Māori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell has to front up about yesterday’s mysterious withdrawal of Te Ture Whenua Bill from Parliament’s order paper, says Labour’s Ikaroa Rawhiti MP Meka Whaitiri. 

“Has he lost his way and has decided to run away from this shambles? He has no mandate from Māori for this legislation and has shunned any intelligent debate.

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Bill English ignorance of law beggars belief

For Bill English to claim he and others in the National Party didn’t realise the law may have been broken in the Todd Barclay taping scandal is simply not credible, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little.

“The Prime Minister stated yesterday that no-one, including himself, thought that the secret taping of a staff member in Todd Barclay’s electorate office was a breach of the law.

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Government ignored advice on Pacific people’s superannuation

The Government ignored advice from the Ministry of Pacific Peoples that raising the Superannuation age of eligibility would have a ‘disproportionately high impact’ on Pacific people, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Aupito William Sio.

 

“The Ministry for Pacific Peoples warned Treasury in February that changing the age of eligibility for New Zealand Superannuation would be detrimental for Pacific people and that they did not support the change.

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