Menu

Media Releases

Chile and NZ arrangement to protect seabirds

New Zealand and Chile will help protect vulnerable seabirds, including the critically endangered Antipodean albatross.

A cooperative arrangement was signed today by Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters, on behalf of Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage and Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash, and the Chilean Minister of Foreign Affairs, Roberto Ampuero, who is visiting New Zealand alongside President Sebastián Piñera.

It establishes a cooperative partnership between the Department of Conservation and the Ministry for Primary Industries in New Zealand, and Chile’s Undersecretariat of Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Ministry of Environment.

“This arrangement marks a significant milestone in tackling the decline of our most vulnerable seabirds and formalises collaboration between New Zealand and Chile on this important issue,” Eugenie Sage said.

Stuart Nash said “this arrangement will enable better exchange of information between our two fishing nations and support greater innovation that will allow us to succeed in our shared goal of reducing albatross bycatch”.

“Central to the arrangement is establishing a Plan of Action for the conservation of Antipodean albatross, which like many other New Zealand endemic seabirds, breeds in New Zealand and forages in waters off Chile in the non-breeding season” said Eugenie Sage.

“These amazing birds roam vast distances across the ocean and their population will no longer be viable in the next 20 years unless we stop the devastating decline in their numbers.”

The biggest threat to these seabirds comes from fishing in the international waters between the two countries, particularly as bycatch in surface longline fisheries.

An important component of the arrangement will be increased cooperation through Regional Fisheries Management Organisations, which govern fishing on the high seas.

“We will be engaging actively with these organisations to improve ways of preventing these precious birds being caught on fishing lines,” Eugenie Sage said. 

“We welcome a closer association with Chile and look forward to a closer association in and around the regional fisheries meetings,” Stuart Nash said.

The Antipodean albatross has undergone an alarming decline in recent years and the species is listed as Nationally Critical by the Department of Conservation, the highest threat classification ranking. They have also been identified as a population of global priority conservation concern by the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP), an international body that seeks to conserve albatrosses and petrels.


Trans-Tasman partnership behind cocaine bust

Police Minister Stuart Nash says the seizure of 190 kilograms of cocaine in Auckland demonstrates the strength of partnership between Australian and New Zealand law enforcement agencies in preventing the harm drugs cause in our communities.

“Targeting transnational organised crime is a priority for the Government,” Mr Nash says.

“The Government’s unprecedented investment in Police in Budget 2018 supports the deployment of 500 extra Police officers to disrupt, deter and dismantle organised criminal networks and reduce harm in our communities. The Budget also funded 127 extra Customs staff.

“Drugs like cocaine cause harm and fuel organised crime networks. I would like to congratulate Australian Federal Police, New Zealand Police and New Zealand Customs staff for their great work in preventing these drugs reaching their destination.

“This operation highlights the key role New Zealand plays internationally in disrupting transnational criminal networks.

“It also showcases the fantastic work Customs and Police staff are doing every day to protect and keep our communities safe.”

Minister of Customs Kris Faafoi said he was pleased to see the focus on consignments transhipping through New Zealand had been effective.

“Additional funding this Government provided in 2018 is aimed at disrupting drugs earlier in the supply chain to prevent harm to the community - this seizure has stopped what would have been a very significant amount of harm.

“This is a good example of what we can achieve when police, border and overseas agencies work together.”


Extra Police constables deployed

Seventy-nine new Police constables will be deployed across New Zealand following the graduation of a new wing of recruits.

Police Minister Stuart Nash has congratulated the recruits of Wing 320 at the formal graduation parade at the Royal New Zealand Police College. He has also thanked the wing patron, Olympian Rob Waddell, for the support, mentoring and advice he offered during the 16-week training.

“This is the thirteenth recruit wing to graduate since the government took office. A new recruit wing graduates every month. We have deployed 941 new constables across the country. The extra Police in our neighbourhoods mean we can increase the focus on crime prevention and building safer communities.

“The Coalition Agreement with New Zealand First has a commitment to strive towards 1800 extra Police over three years. In addition there will be 485 extra support staff. We need to train an average of 1000 Police every year over this period to take account of attrition of current Police. The attrition rate is running at around five per cent and is one of the lowest in the wider state sector.

“Today’s new constables will be deployed across all Police districts, with the largest cohort of 27 recruits posted to the three Police districts in greater Auckland.

“Female constables make up 26 percent of the wing. More than 12 percent of recruits identify as Maori, more than seven percent as Pasifika, and six per cent as Asian. The youngest recruit is 18 and the oldest is 46. At least twelve new constables were born outside New Zealand and share seven foreign languages between them.

“Many of the new officers bring a strong tradition of volunteer service in their communities. It includes volunteer firefighters, search and rescue and civil defence experts, surf lifesavers, counsellors with Lifeline, the Salvation Army, Oranga Tamaraki and others who have worked to protect wildlife in conservation areas. 

“I am proud of the depth of diversity, talent, and commitment to community service which our new constables already demonstrate. These new officers will help us to meet our goals of reducing victimisation and bringing down offending and imprisonment rates.


SPEECH - Andrew Little confirms Pike River Mine Drift re-entry plan to proceed

Next Monday is the 8th anniversary of the dreadful tragedy at Pike River Coal Mine. Two men escaped with their lives. 29 others never came home.

Continue reading →

Andrew Little confirms Pike River Mine Drift re-entry plan to proceed

The Pike River Mine Drift will be re-entered, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little announced today.

Continue reading →

Significant step in Pike River drift re-entry

Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little has received the report on re-entering the Pike River drift following nine months of intensive work by Te Kāhui Whakamana Rua Tekau Mā Iwa Pike River Recovery Agency.

Continue reading →

Ngāpuhi mandate proposal to vote

Ngāpuhi rangatira and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little have unanimously agreed to move towards negotiations by taking the vote to the people after meeting at Parliament tonight

Continue reading →

Criminal Case Review Commission Bill passes first reading

Justice Minister Andrew Little’s Bill establishing a Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) passed its First Reading in Parliament today. 

Continue reading →